Iowa City, Iowa (June 30, 2017)

The acoustic jazz ensemble, Rhythm Future Quartet has a straightforward agenda: to keep the spirit of Gypsy jazz alive and expanding in today’s musical universe. The virtuosic foursome, named for a Django Reinhardt tune, offers up a newly minted sound, influenced by the classic Hot Club of France, yet wholly contemporary. Led by violinist Jason Anick and guitarist Olli Soikkeli, the quartet performs dynamic and lyrical arrangements of both Gypsy jazz standards and original compositions that draw upon diverse international rhythms and musical idioms. With Max O’Rourke on second guitar and Greg Loughman on bass, Rhythm Future is dedicated to expanding the boundaries of a vital musical genre.

Where the band’s self-titled debut album re-visited classic jazz and Gypsy jazz favorites, Travels, the quartet’s current release, concentrates on group originals that make captivating use of musical sources from outside the conventional Gypsy jazz terrain. Travels reflects both the accumulated knowledge garnered from the groups world wide touring as well as the international influences that inspired new rhythmic and harmonic possibilities within their compositions and arrangements.

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George Burrows' fascination with live music began in the 60's. He saw Cream on October 14, 1968, at Vets Auditorium in Des Moines, One year later Burrows attended The Denver Pop Festival in Mile High Stadium. He witnessed The Jimi Hendrix Experience's final gig on June 29, 1969. His list of artists included many who have shaped music for decades. Around 1993 Burrows become friends/colleagues with people in the music industry. He had developed an impressive networking resume which he used it to his advantage and began a concert photography website. He worked for free through multiple live music websites designed to promote live music and the often struggling artists and venues. His shoot for no pay was an obstacle with other photographers. Burrows’ sole purpose for LGS was for the art, not monetary means. He lived in the music environment and soon developed name recognition. After the loss of his brother, a professional drummer, in 2014, he became serious about becoming a drummer. Burrows began drum lessons. The LGS website, contributors and his studies did not match. In 2016 he was about to pull the plug on LGS and embrace drumming. After a chance consultation with one of the most highly regarded session drummers and programmers today he got his answer. Start a website featuring only drummers. With help, he launched https://www.drummersphotgrapher.com. Burrows added his passion for drumming with his expertise of live music photography by launching Drummer Photographer LGS.

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