Iowa City, Iowa (July 2, 2016)

Marquis Hill, trumpet; Christopher McBride, alto saxophone; (Justin Thomas), vibraphone; Joshua Ramos, bass; Makaya McCraven, drums

Bio

“Marquis Hill played five tunes for a panel of judges, and won the Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition. You can think of it as a sort of Heisman Trophy for young jazz artists, meaning that a lot more people discovered his talent in a hurry.

Hill’s profile may have risen suddenly, but talent like that doesn’t spontaneously emerge from nowhere. It takes a village of mentors, peers, opportunities and other educational infrastructure to enable a musician to grow. That’s especially true with jazz, an inherently social music historically conveyed through the oral tradition. Besides, in his hometown of Chicago, folks had already known about Hill for some time: That’s the “village” that raised him, after all.

Marquis Hill now splits his time between the Windy City and New York City, but still maintains a snappy working band full of catchy melodic ideas — a five-piece outfit he calls the Marquis Hill Blacktet. On one of his trips back home this summer, we asked him to show us “his” Chicago, culminating in a Blacktet performance downtown at one of the city’s premier clubs: the Jazz Showcase.” by

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George Burrows' fascination with live music began in the 60's. He saw Cream on October 14, 1968, at Vets Auditorium in Des Moines, One year later Burrows attended The Denver Pop Festival in Mile High Stadium. He witnessed The Jimi Hendrix Experience's final gig on June 29, 1969. His list of artists included many who have shaped music for decades. Around 1993 Burrows become friends/colleagues with people in the music industry. He had developed an impressive networking resume which he used it to his advantage and began a concert photography website. He worked for free through multiple live music websites designed to promote live music and the often struggling artists and venues. His shoot for no pay was an obstacle with other photographers. Burrows’ sole purpose for LGS was for the art, not monetary means. He lived in the music environment and soon developed name recognition. After the loss of his brother, a professional drummer, in 2014, he became serious about becoming a drummer. Burrows began drum lessons. The LGS website, contributors and his studies did not match. In 2016 he was about to pull the plug on LGS and embrace drumming. After a chance consultation with one of the most highly regarded session drummers and programmers today he got his answer. Start a website featuring only drummers. With help, he launched https://www.drummersphotgrapher.com. Burrows added his passion for drumming with his expertise of live music photography by launching Drummer Photographer LGS.

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