Las Vegas, Nevada (May 15, 2015)

 B.B. King passed Thursday night May 14, 2015  at age 89.  On behalf of LGS I want to extend our thoughts and prayers to his family, friends, and fans.

“I have been around a long time and really paid my dues…” Riley B. King

Mr. King opened the refurbished Paramount Theatre in Cedar Rapids, Ia November 18, 2012.   

 

From Paramount Theater website:

Throughout the 1990′s as well as the 1980′s, 1970′s, 1960′s and 1950′s, there has been only one King of the Blues – Riley B. King, affectionately known as B.B. King. Since B.B. started recording in the late 1940′s, he has released over 60 albums many of them considered blues classics. Over the years, B.B. has had two number one R & B hits, 1951′s “Three O’Clock Blues”, and 1952′s “You Don’t Know Me”, and four number two R & B hits, 1953′s “Please Love Me”, and 1954′s “You Upset Me Baby”, 1960′s “Sweet Sixteen, Part I”, and 1966′s “Don’t Answer The Door, Part I”. B.B.’s most popular crossover hit, 1970′s “The Thrill Is Gone” went to #15 pop. Over the years, B.B. has developed one of the world’s most readily identified guitar styles. He borrowed from Lonnie Johnson, Blind Lemon Jefferson, T-Bone Walker and others, integrating his precise vocal like string bends and his left hand vibrato, both of which have become indispensable components of rock guitarist’s vocabulary. His economy, his every note counts phrasing, has been a model for thousands of players including Eric Clapton, George Harrison and Jeff Beck. B.B. has mixed traditional blues, jazz, swing, mainstream pop and jump into a unique sound. His singing is richly melodic, both vocally and in the “singing” that comes from his guitar. In B.B’s words, “When I sing, I play in my mind; the minute I stop singing orally, I start to sing by playing Lucille”.

 

 

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George Burrows' fascination with live music began in the 60's. He saw Cream on October 14, 1968, at Vets Auditorium in Des Moines, One year later Burrows attended The Denver Pop Festival in Mile High Stadium. He witnessed The Jimi Hendrix Experience's final gig on June 29, 1969. His list of artists included many who have shaped music for decades. Around 1993 Burrows become friends/colleagues with people in the music industry. He had developed an impressive networking resume which he used it to his advantage and began a concert photography website. He worked for free through multiple live music websites designed to promote live music and the often struggling artists and venues. His shoot for no pay was an obstacle with other photographers. Burrows’ sole purpose for LGS was for the art, not monetary means. He lived in the music environment and soon developed name recognition. After the loss of his brother, a professional drummer, in 2014, he became serious about becoming a drummer. Burrows began drum lessons. The LGS website, contributors and his studies did not match. In 2016 he was about to pull the plug on LGS and embrace drumming. After a chance consultation with one of the most highly regarded session drummers and programmers today he got his answer. Start a website featuring only drummers. With help, he launched https://www.drummersphotgrapher.com. Burrows added his passion for drumming with his expertise of live music photography by launching Drummer Photographer LGS.